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I've been asked to find out all sorts of things, but being asked to find out why semis are quilted may be the cutest one yet. It comes from a Rochester, Minnesota, 6-year-old that wants to know why some semi trucks have "quilted" back doors. I'd be a real heel if I didn't find out the answer the same day it came in so let's go...

Here's the e-mail...

James Rabe eamil

I'm happy to help, Abby. First thing I found out, thanks to Utility, the industry doesn't call 'em quilted, they call them Diamond Pattern Stainless Steel Doors. But I think quilted is cuter, so I'm sticking with that.

Why are they quilted? Once you hear the answer you'll say, "Oh, of course!" Ready?

The quilting makes it easier for cars and trucks following the truck by reducing or eliminating the sun reflecting right into your eyes. Like a bunch of little mirrors, they shoot the light away from you.

You didn't ask, Abby, but in case your kid does, the doors are super shiny because they're super buffed stainless steel and they do that because it makes them easier to clean. 

As a quick comparison, check out the back of a semi without the quilted doors. I'm glaring at it realizing how much glare it gives off. You might say, it's glaringly obvious!

Getty Images

As always, if you have a comment, complaint, or concern about something I wrote here, please let me know: james.rabe@townsquaremedia.com

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PS - Did you know they had trucks as far back as 1914? It's true!

26th March 1914: Lowering a race horse's travelling box onto the back of a lorry, 1914. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

As long as we're talking things with motors and wheels, take a slow scroll thru this gallery to find the car that debuted the year you were born. Is it awesome? Do you wish you had one?

LOOK: See the iconic cars that debuted the year you were born